Skip to navigation – Site map
Apports des géosciences

Caspian Sea-level changes at the end of Little Ice Age and its impacts on the avulsion of the Gorgan River : a multidisciplinary case study from the southeastern flank of the Caspian Sea

Changements du niveau relatif de la mer Caspienne pendant le petit âge de glace et impacts sur l’avulsion du Gorgan
Abdolmajid Naderi Beni, Hamid Lahijani, Morsen Pourkerman, Rahman Jokar, Muna Hosseindoust, Nick Marriner, Monteza Djamali, Valérie Andrieu-Ponel and Abolghasem Kamkar
p. 145-155

Abstracts

The Caspian Sea is the largest lake in the world and has been characterized by significant sea-level changes since the Pliocene, when it was disconnected from open sea. These sea-level oscillations have had different impacts on its coastal evolution depending on geomorphological setting. River avulsion on the southeastern flank of the Caspian Sea during the Little Ice Age (LIA), as a consequence of rapid sea-level changes, was studied using sedimentological, historical and geophysical tools. The results show that the Gorgan River and/or its tributaries changed their course during the LIA. The river avulsion could be linked to higher precipitation in the region and rapid Caspian Sea level rise during the second half of the LIA.

Top of page

Excerpt

Cairn

Full-text article available to subscribers or on a "pay per view" basis. It will be available on this URL in January 2018.
Read it

Outline

1 - Geographical Setting
2 ‑ Material and Methods
2.1 ‑ Ground Penetrating Radar profiles
2.2 - Sediment core sampling
2.3 ‑ Fossil content
2.4 ‑ Sedimentology
2.5 - Historical evidence
3 - Results and interpretation
3.1 ‑ Sedimentology, sedimentary facies and environmental interpretations :
3.2 Ground Penetration Radar
3.2.1 Radar Facies
3.2.2 - Radar Profiles
3.3 - Historical documents
4 - Discussion
Conclusion

First lines

The Caspian Sea and its rapid sea-level fluctuations during the Holocene (Fig. 1) has been the subject of significant research during the last two decades (MAMEDOV, 1997; RYCHAGOV, 1997; KROONENBERG etal., 2000; LAHIJANI et al., 2009; LEROY et al., 2011; KAKROODI et al., 2012; NADERI BENI et al., 2013a and 2013b).

Fig. 1 – Caspian Sea level changes during the last millennium

Fig. 1 – Caspian Sea level changes during the last millennium

The dotted horizontal line denotes the present sea-level position. The dashed line indicates the reconstructed sea-level changes during last millennium based on historical and geological evidence (Naderi Beni et al., 2013a). The continuous line depicts the instrumental sea-level record since the 1830s.

The main pacemaker of long-term Caspian Sea level changes is climate (KROONENBERG et al., 2007; NADERI BENI et al., 2013a; LEROY et al., 2013). These sea‑level oscillations have had different impacts on coastal evolution depending on the coastal setting (NADERI BENI et al., 2013b). Coastal de...

Top of page

References

Electronic reference

Abdolmajid Naderi Beni, Hamid Lahijani, Morsen Pourkerman, Rahman Jokar, Muna Hosseindoust, Nick Marriner, Monteza Djamali, Valérie Andrieu-Ponel and Abolghasem Kamkar, « Caspian Sea-level changes at the end of Little Ice Age and its impacts on the avulsion of the Gorgan River : a multidisciplinary case study from the southeastern flank of the Caspian Sea  », Méditerranée [Online], 122 | 2014, Online since 19 June 2016, connection on 20 November 2017. URL : http://mediterranee.revues.org/7226 ; DOI : 10.4000/mediterranee.7226

Top of page

About the authors

Abdolmajid Naderi Beni

Marine Geology Department, Iranian National Institute for Oceanography and Atmospheric Sciences (INIOAS), Tehran, Iran, amnaderi@inio.ac.ir, majid.naderi@gmail.com

Hamid Lahijani

Marine Geology Department, Iranian National Institute for Oceanography and Atmospheric Sciences (INIOAS), Tehran, Iran

Morsen Pourkerman

Marine Geology Department, Iranian National Institute for Oceanography and Atmospheric Sciences (INIOAS), Tehran, Iran

Rahman Jokar

Marine Geology Department, Iranian National Institute for Oceanography and Atmospheric Sciences (INIOAS), Tehran, Iran

Muna Hosseindoust

Marine Geology Department, Iranian National Institute for Oceanography and Atmospheric Sciences (INIOAS), Tehran, Iran

Nick Marriner

CNRS, Laboratoire Chrono-Environnement UMR 6249, Université de Franche-Comté, UFR ST, Besançon, France, nick.marriner@univ-fcomte.fr

By this author

Monteza Djamali

Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, Institut méditerranéen de Biodiversité et d’Écologie UMR 7263, Europôle Méditerranéen de l’Arbois, Aix-en-Provence, France

Valérie Andrieu-Ponel

Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, Institut méditerranéen de Biodiversité et d’Écologie UMR 7263, Europôle Méditerranéen de l’Arbois, Aix-en-Provence, France

Abolghasem Kamkar

Shahrood University (School of Mining, Petroleum and Geophysics), Shahrood University, Iran

Top of page

Copyright

Tous droits réservés

Top of page